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Saudi women to attend football game for first time

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia will allow women to enter a football stadium for the first time to watch a match Friday, as the kingdom eases strict decades-old rules separating the sexes.

The new measure comes after Riyadh, long known for imposing harsh restrictions on women, announced it was lifting a ban prohibiting them from driving as well as reopening cinemas.

The Islamic kingdom has announced a series of reforms initiated by powerful Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman since last year.

The first football match that women will be allowed to attend is a clash on Friday between Saudi Premier League clubs Al-Ahli and Al-Batin in the Red Sea city of Jeddah.

The game is scheduled to kick off at 8:00 pm (1700 GMT), but enthusiasm for the historic encounter has begun well before the referee’s whistle is blown.

Lamya Khaled Nasser, a 32-year-old soccer fan from Jeddah, said she was proud and looking forward to attending the match.

“This event proves that we are heading for a prosperous future. I am very proud to be a witness of this massive change,” she told AFP.

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Ruwayda Ali Qassem, another Jeddah resident, described the match as a “historic day in the kingdom which culminates ongoing fundamental changes”.

“I am proud and extremely happy for this development and for the kingdom’s moves to catch up with civilised measures adopted by many countries,” she said.

The Saudi government said last week that women would be allowed to attend a second match on Saturday and a third next Thursday.

The kingdom, which has some of the world’s tightest restrictions on women, has long barred them from sports arenas through strict rules that keep the sexes apart in public.

‘Happiness and joy’

But in September, hundreds of women were allowed to enter a sports stadium in the capital Riyadh, used mostly for football matches, for the first time to attend celebrations marking Saudi Arabia’s national day.

The easing of social controls comes as Prince Mohammed looks to repackage the oil-rich nation as more moderate and welcoming.

The powerful crown princes’ “Vision 2030” programme for a post-oil era stems partly from an economic motive to boost domestic spending on entertainment as the kingdom reels from an energy slump.

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Noura Bakharji, another Jeddah resident, said she always felt bitter when her brothers came back from stadiums to tell her about the excitement of watching football matches in person.

“I always watched games on TV while my brothers went to the stadiums… I asked myself repeatedly ‘Why I can’t go?'” she told AFP.

“Today, things have changed. It’s a day of happiness and joy.”

Hours before the game, Saudi clubs encouraged women to go to the stadiums through tweets on social media.

Some clubs are offering special abayas — traditional head-to-toe robes for Saudi women — in their team’s colours.

State-owned Saudi Airlines announced prizes of free tickets for five families who wish to travel between cities to watch football games.

The Jeddah Pearl Stadium, where the game will be played, has announced it has allocated special seats for women and families.

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