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Lung cancer

Lung cancer screening complications may be higher than expected

Invasive follow-up tests to examine abnormalities found with lung cancer screening may lead to more complications and extra healthcare costs than doctors previously thought, a US study suggests. Many doctors advise older adults who are current or former smokers to get annual lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) based on a pivotal 2011 trial reporting 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality rates than when screening was done with chest x-rays. With LDCT, however, more than one in four patients get…

Cigarette filters may increase lung cancer risk

Cigarette filters, introduced decades ago to reduce the amount of tar smokers inhale, also alter other properties of smoke and smoking in a way that raises the risk of lung cancer, researchers say. In a review of research on changes in lung cancer rates, and changes in the types of lung cancer that are most common, the study authors argue that tiny ventilation holes in virtually all cigarettes sold today are creating a new health risk. "The design of cigarette filters that have ventilation can make the cigarettes even…

Gene activity in the nose may signal lung cancer: study

BOSTON: Genetic changes in the cells lining the inside of the nose might someday help doctors diagnose lung cancer, a recent study suggests. “The idea that you don't have to sample the disease tissue but can diagnose presence of disease using relatively accessible cells that are far from the tumor . . . is a paradigm that can impact many cancers,” Dr. Avrum Spira from Boston University School of Medicine, a member of the study team, told Reuters Health by email. The layer of cells that covers the surfaces of the body…

Roche lung cancer drug success adds to pressure on Bristol

COPENHAGEN: Lung cancer patients on Roche's immune system-boosting drug Tecentriq lived on average 4.2 months longer than those taking chemotherapy in a pivotal study, pressuring Bristol-Myers Squibb's dominant position in the field. The trial involved second-line patients, who have already used chemotherapy, and it found the Roche drug worked even in people with low or no levels of a protein called PD-L1, which is often used to test suitability for immunotherapy. The study results were presented at the annual European…