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Nobel Prize

Americans Nordhaus, Romer win Nobel Economics Prize

STOCKHOLM: Americans William Nordhaus and Paul Romer won the 2018 Nobel Economics Prize for work in integrating climate change and technological innovation into economic analysis, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said on Monday. Nordhaus, of Yale University, was the first person to create a quantitative model that described the interplay between the economy and the climate, the academy said. Romer, of New York University’s Stern School of Business, has shown how economic forces govern the willingness of firms to…

1,001 ways to lose a Nobel Prize

OSLO: It's easier to lose a Nobel Prize than to win one. Smuggled out to impress girls in a bar, or dissolved to prevent the Nazis from getting their hands on one, the precious gold medals have gone missing in crazy, tragic or spectacular ways over the more than hundred-year history of the Nobel Prize. Here are some of them: - Dissolved in acid - When the Nazis invaded Denmark in April 1940, scientists at Niels Bohr's Institute for Theoretical Physics began to worry about the 1914 and 1925 Nobel Physics Prize…

Japanese Nobel winner hospitalized in US, wife found dead

CHICAGO: A Japanese Nobel Prize-winner was hospitalized Wednesday and his wife was dead, reportedly after driving off a road in rural Illinois. Ei-ichi Negishi, 82, a chemist teaching at Purdue University in the neighboring state of Indiana, and his wife Sumire Negishi, 80, were reported missing Monday. Police found them early on Tuesday morning about 200 miles (320 km) northeast of their home, on land belonging to the Orchard Hills Landfill operated by the company Advanced Disposal. Police discovered Ei-ichi…

Afghan institute, Metallica win music’s ‘Nobel Prize’

STOCKHOLM: An Afghan music institute that has empowered girls in the war-torn country and metal pioneers Metallica on Wednesday shared the Polar Music Prize, often called music's Nobel. The laureates will each receive one million Swedish kronor (101,000 euros, $125,000) at a televised gala in Stockholm on June 14 in the presence of King Carl XVI Gustaf. The Afghan National Institute of Music was honoured along with its founder, Ahmad Sarmast, who started the school in 2010 in a rare coeducational initiative in the…

Nobel prize winner’s book turned down by 19 publishers

PARIS: The French writer Claude Simon, who won the Nobel prize for literature in 1985, would not be published today, according to an experiment conducted by one of his fans. Writer Serge Volle sent 50 pages of Simon's 1962 novel, "The Palace", set during the Spanish Civil War, to 19 French publishers. The verdict was damning: Twelve rejected it and seven didn't even bother to reply. One editor said that the book's "endlessly long sentences completely lose the reader", Volle told French public radio on Monday. Nor…

Einstein theory of happy living emerges in Tokyo note

JERUSALEM: A note that Albert Einstein gave to a courier in Tokyo, briefly describing his theory on happy living, has surfaced after 95 years and is up for auction in Jerusalem. The year was 1922, and the German-born physicist, most famous for his theory of relativity, was on a lecture tour in Japan. He had recently been informed that he was to receive the Nobel Prize for physics, and his fame outside of scientific circles was growing. A Japanese courier arrived at the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo to deliver Einstein a…

US says no plan to sign global anti-nuclear treaty

WASHINGTON: The United States said Friday it has no intention of signing a nuclear weapons ban treaty backed by this year's Nobel Peace Prize laureate, while insisting on its commitment to "creating the conditions for nuclear disarmament." "This treaty will not make the world more peaceful, will not result in the elimination of a single nuclear weapon, and will not enhance any state's security," a State Department spokesman told AFP, stressing that none of the world's nuclear-armed powers had backed the text. The…

Demand surges for Nobel winner’s works in native Japan

TOKYO: The Japanese publisher of Nagasaki-born Kazuo Ishiguro said on Friday it would republish eight of the British author's books in translation, reporting "a huge number of orders" after he won the Nobel Literature Prize. Ishiguro left Japan when he was five and moved to Britain, only returning to visit his native land as an adult three decades later. Japan had been pinning its hopes on its best-known novelist Haruki Murakami to win the Nobel Prize but eagerly claimed a link to the British winner with Japanese…