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Tech giants respond more quickly to hate speech: EU

BRUSSELS: Internet giants have more than doubled the rate at which they fight hate speech online than when they joined the European Union's voluntary approach in 2016, EU officials said Monday. Firms like YouTube, Microsoft, Twitter, and Facebook are now assessing 89 percent of flagged content within 24 hours and removing 72 percent of content deemed illegal, the officials said. The figures compare to 40 percent and 28 percent respectively when the firms signed up to a code of conduct in 2016, according to officials…

Tech giants in spotlight as EU lawmakers consider strong action

BRUSSELS: Google (GOOGL.O), Amazon (AMZN.O), Apple (AAPL.O) and other tech giants face one of their biggest challenges this week as a key EU lawmaking committee prepares to take a tough stance on legislation designed to curb their power and boost the rights of businesses. In a bid to ensure a level playing field between the tech companies and bricks-and-mortar businesses, the European Commission in April drafted rules to prevent unfair business practices by app stores, search engines, e-commerce sites and hotel booking…

US tech giants plan to fight India’s data localisation plans

NEW DELHI: US technology giants plan to intensify lobbying efforts against stringent Indian data localisation requirements, which they say will undermine their growth ambitions in India, sources told Reuters. U.S trade groups, representing companies such as Amazon, American Express and Microsoft, have opposed India’s push to store data locally. That push comes amid rising global efforts to protect user data but is one that could hit planned investments by the firms in the Indian market, where the companies currently have…

UK may use taxes to get tech giants to do more to fight extremism, minister says

LONDON: Britain may impose new taxes on tech giants like Google and Facebook unless they do more to combat online extremism by taking down material aimed at radicalizing people or helping them to prepare attacks, the country’s security minister said. Ben Wallace accused tech firms of being happy to sell people’s data but not to give it to the government which was being forced to spend vast sums on de-radicalization programs, surveillance and other counter-terrorism measures. “If they continue to be less than…