Web
Analytics
The news is by your side.

Venom

Treatment of patients from venom by a Beekeeper therapist of Cairo

CAIRO: On his rooftop in the outskirts of Cairo, Omar Abulhassan raises thousands of bees — not for the honey, but their venom. After reading about the benefits of bees in the Koran, Abulhassan, 30, decided five years ago to raise the insects and use the venom in alternative therapy. He believes bee stings can relieve pain and cure illnesses such as rheumatism. “These are not the only benefits,” said Abulhassan, who has no medical background. “It helps with having a better mood.” He now treats about five people a…

Tom Hardy brings out Marvel’s darker side in new movie ‘Venom’

LOS ANGELES: In the new movie “Venom,” British actor Tom Hardy plays an investigative journalist whose body is invaded by an alien with violent instincts who feeds on a diet of human flesh. It is a darker tale from the Marvel Comics superhero universe than what audiences have seen in recent films such as “The Avengers” series released by Walt Disney Co. “His version of doing good is just eating,” Hardy said of Venom. “The world is an all-you-can-eat buffet, and human beings are on the menu, so that’s not great for…

The man who injects himself with snake venom holds hope for new antidote

LONDON: For nearly 30 years, London-based reptile enthusiast and musician Steve Ludwin has been injecting snake venom -- a practice that has almost killed him. It may now help save thousands of lives, as researchers search for a new antidote based on his body's response to the toxic fluids. "It sounds very crazy what I am doing but it turns out that it potentially has lots of health benefits," Ludwin, the tattooed 51-year-old told AFP in the living room of his home in the British capital. Ludwin demonstrated his…

Scientists develop scorpion ‘milking machine’ for disease research

CASABLANCA, Morocco: Extracting venom from scorpions can be a dangerous, but rewarding, task. The poisonous secretion, while fatal to humans, contains hundreds of components that have potential uses in the health sector when they are broken down to a molecular level. In a bid to remove the venom safely, for both scorpion and extractor, a group of scientists in Morocco have developed a remote-controlled 'milking machine', which straps to the scorpion's tail and uses an electric impulse to stimulate the venom glands for…

Venom of tiny fish could lead to new pain treatments

WASHINGTON: Tiny fanged fish called blennies, which swim in the coral reefs of the Pacific Ocean, are armed with an unusual venom that could inspire new pain medications, British and Australian scientists said this week. The venom of these fearless 1.5-three inch (four-seven centimeter) swimmers -- which are popular tropical aquarium fish -- numbs would-be predators, rather than causing them pain, said the report in the journal Current Biology. "The fish injects other fish with opioid peptides that act like heroin or…

Deadly snakes ‘milked’ to create potent new anti-venom

LIVERPOOL: A new anti-venom to treat victims of potentially deadly snake bites in sub-Saharan Africa is just a few years away from reality, according to scientists at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM). They aim to create a potent new anti-venom that can be stored safely at room temperature, without the need for refrigeration.