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Imran Khan promises accountability, transparency in first speech as PM-elect

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s PM-elect Imran Khan on Friday vowed to fulfill all his campaign promises shortly after being elected as 22nd prime minister of the country, ARY News reported.

“I will not leave those who looted this country for years, who spent all our taxpayers’ money abroad and didn’t let this country progress, there will be no reconciliation with the looters, accountability will be our top priority,” Imran Khan said during his first speech as PM-elect in National Assembly.

Imran Khan

The Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) chief who received 176 votes during the election for 22nd prime minister of the country, rejected all allegations of election rigging leveled by opposition and repeated that his party won’t object if anyone approaches Election Commission with such a complaint.

“In 2013, I was demanding scrutiny in just four constituencies but was dubbed a conspirator and all sorts of delaying tactics were used (by the then ruling party PML-N). When I resorted to protest, I was again dubbed an agitator for exercising my constitutional right but I promise we will not stop you from demanding scrutiny or protest, in fact, if you will come out on streets, we will offer you our own container for the purpose,” said Imran Khan.

The PM-elect reminded all and sundry that as cricket captain, he was the first to demand neutral umpires to ensure transparency and now as “we are in power, we will implement the same ideals to reform the electoral process and make it transparent”.

He promised once again that no party will be treated unjustly during his tenure but reminded them that he will not let them run away with the country’s wealth in the name of “political victimisation”.

Khan, 65, saw his party sweep to victory in a July 25 general election promising to fight corruption and lift millions of people out of poverty.

Pakistan has been plagued by boom-and-bust cycles and military coups since independence in 1947, as well as by militant violence in more recent years.

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